Mary as Earth Covered by the Blue Tent of the Sky

Tintoretto, 1573, Mary with the child, adored by the Evangelists Mark and Luke, US Public Domain
Tintoretto, 1573, Mary with the child, adored by the Evangelists Mark and Luke, US Public Domain

In the image above, we see Mary with Child. She wears the celestial cloak. Carl Jung speaks to the archetypal significance of this:

“Blue is the color of Mary’s celestial cloak; she is the earth covered by the blue tent of the sky…”

Mary is earth covered by Sky. She is Queen of Heaven. She is “Mother of God” (p. 87). Jung continues:

“According to the dogma she is only beata, divine. Moreover, she represents the earth, which is also the body and its darkness. That is the reason why she, the all-merciful, has the power of attorney to plead for all sinners, but also why, despite her privileged position (it is not possible for the angels to sin), she has a relationship with the Trinity which is rationally not comprehensible, since it is so close and yet so distant.”

Jung understands that it is Mary’s relation to the earth and body that gives her the power to redeem. As related to earth, Jung also relates the mother image to the matrix, the vessel. Jung says:

“As the matrix, the vessel, the earth, she can be interpreted allegorically as the rotundum, is characterized by the four cardinal points.”

Reference:

  1. The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche (Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 8) by C. G.-  p. 87

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Kamadeva: the deity emerges out of original chaos

Kamadeva, God of Love, 18th-19th century. US public domain via wikimedia
Kamadeva, God of Love, 18th-19th century. US public domain via wikimedia

In the image above, we see a man sitting on a bird. He holds a bow and arrow. He is Kama Deva, the god of love. Kamadeva is said to be the son of the mother goddess Shri Devi.

Carl Jung speaks of “Kama, the God of love”, as “a cosmogonic principle.” Cosmogony is the emergence of the cosmos. In the hymn of creation (Nasadiya Sukta) from the Rig Veda (10.129), we find Kama mentioned as a cosmic principle, as cosmic love.

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The Circle as Image of the Deity

The alchemical Squaring of the Circle, within the microcosm of the Work. D. Stolcius von Stolcenberg, Viridarium chymicum, Frankfurt, 1624. Extract from "The Golden Game", Stanislas Klossowsky de Rola. US Public Domain
The alchemical Squaring of the Circle, within the microcosm of the Work. D. Stolcius von Stolcenberg, Viridarium chymicum, Frankfurt, 1624. Extract from “The Golden Game”, Stanislas Klossowsky de Rola. US Public Domain

Medieval alchemists used the Quadratura Circuli, or squared circle, to represent the synthesis of the four elements — earth, water, fire and air. Carl Jung says “they knew in those days that the circle meant the deity” and later that “the idea of those philosophers was that God manifested himself first in the creation of the four elements. They were symbolized by the four partitions of the circle.” (ibid. p. 70) The alchemist say God as conceild within nature, and the alchemical work as holding the potential to “produce the dormant demiurge” (p. 67).  This production of the deity is often symbolized by the image of the “conjunctio” (see p.67), or “philosopher’s stone”, as the “a perfect living being of hermaphroditic nature” (p.68) Carl Jung says:

Continue reading “The Circle as Image of the Deity”