Symbols of the Self Arise from the Depths of the Body

Sapta Chakra, from a Yoga manuscipt in Braj Bhasa lanaguage with 118 pages. 1899. US Public Domain via wikimedia.
Sapta Chakra, from a Yoga manuscipt in Braj Bhasa lanaguage with 118 pages. 1899. US Public Domain via wikimedia.

In the image above, we see a Yogi revealing his subtle body.

In The Archetypes and The Collective Unconscious, Carl Jung notes that “symbols of the self arise in the depths of the body.” This is a profound statement, and speaks to the interrelationality between body, psyche and Self. Jung says:

“The symbols of the self arise in the depths of the body and they express its materiality every bit as much as the structure of the perceiving consciousness. The symbol is thus a living body, corpus et anima.” (Carl Jung, Cw 9i, para 291)

Continue reading “Symbols of the Self Arise from the Depths of the Body”

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Christ: the divine image is the inner most possession of the soul

Hildegard von Bingen, Liber Divinorum Operum, The Universal Man, Liber Divinorum Operum of St. Hildegard of Bingen, 1165 Biblioteca statale, Lucca (Italia)
Hildegard von Bingen, Liber Divinorum Operum, The Universal Man, Liber Divinorum Operum of St. Hildegard of Bingen, 1165 Biblioteca statale, Lucca (Italia). US public domain, wikimedia

 

“Too few people have experienced the divine image as the inner most possession of their souls. Christ only meets them from without, never from within the soul.” — Carl Jung CW12 p. 12.

Often we think of the divine as somewhere beyond, as something to be achieved at the end of life, or experienced as a state of perfection.  The divine is linked with our concepts of other-worldliness, and lofty heights. This is the transcendent view of the divine, a view that has dominated Christianity. In the image above we see another perspective, ‘the Universal Man.’ Christ is realized as the inner most possession of the soul. This appears to be a Christian image of the universal self or cosmic Self.