Samantabhadra: Syzygy in the form of divine union

Adi Buddha Samantabhadra, Unknown artist, unknown date, via Wikimedia Public Domain.
Adi Buddha Samantabhadra, Unknown artist, unknown date, via Wikimedia Public Domain.

As a basic principle, archetypes are not realized in static form but present in dynamic form, expressing transformations in consciousness. Archetypal images transform as awareness transforms. Or said another way, archetypes appear in various forms as consciousness shifts.

In terms of enlightenment, sacred images represent transformations in consciousness, expressing a movement from duality to integration and wholeness. Archetypes are therefore expressed in symbols of transformation: representing transformations in consciousness; transforming as consciousness transforms. [1].

The syzygy is a potent symbol of transformation, representing core transformations in the phenomenology of the Self [2]. The transformations in the syzygy archetype emerge along with transformations of the self, movements from duality to integration.

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Dream Yoga: transformation processes announce themselves mainly in dreams

Illustrations of practitioner of ancient Tibetan yoga. US public domain via wikimedia
Illustrations of practitioner of ancient Tibetan yoga. US public domain via wikimedia

Carl Jung understood that psychic transformations presents itself in dream form. He says: “Natural transformation processes announce themselves mainly in dreams.” (Carl Jung 9i para 235)

For Jung, dreams are coincident with the process of psychic transformation. Such transformation is a “long-drawn-out process of inner transformation and rebirth into another being. ” When Jung speaks of this ‘other being’ he is speaking of ‘the other person in ourselves-that larger and greater personality maturing within us, whom we have already met as the inner friend of the soul.” (ibid)

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Chakrasamvara: Syzygy as the paired opposites

Yab Yum, Chakrasamvara & Vajravarahi, Tibet, c. 15th Century, The Nasli and Alice Heeramaneck Collection, US Public Domain
Chakrasamvara, Tibet, c. 15th Century, The Nasli and Alice Heeramaneck Collection, US Public Domain

In the above image, we see a mandala image from 15th Century Tibetan Buddhism. The central deity in the mandala is Samvara. Samvara is considered the image of “Supreme Bliss” [1]. He is blue in color, with twelve arms, and four faces. He embraces Vajravārāhī, who is red in color. Vajravārāhī means the “”The Diamond Sow” [2]. In Tibetan Buddhism, the syzygy is called Yab-Yum, as metaphor of the union of bliss and emptiness.

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