Jakob Bohme and the Split within God

Theosophia revelata, Jokob Böhme, 1730- US public domain via wikimedia
Theosophia revelata, Jokob Böhme, 1730- US public domain via wikimedia

Böhme’s cosmology includes a division into the light and a dark aspects of the God image. For Böhme’s the God-image is split from within. The split is between the Holy Ghost as the light aspect and the Father as the dark.

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Christ’s Androgyny: image of the Self

Consegna della legge (dettaglio cristo imberbe), santa costanza roma IV secolo. US public domain via wikimedia
Consegna della legge (dettaglio cristo imberbe), santa costanza roma IV secolo. US public domain via wikimedia

Christ is an image of the Self. When images of the Self take on anthropomorphic form, we often find androgynous characteristics.

The androgyny appears from time to time throughout history, taking various forms. Images show up in art, myths, alchemy, as well as in our dreams and imagination, as an archetypal symbol of integration of opposites. Continue reading “Christ’s Androgyny: image of the Self”

Breaking Dawn: the soul in the Aurora Consurgens

An illustration of a hermaphrodite from the Aurora consurgens-- 15th century. Thomas Aquinas; Marie-Louise von Franz (1966) Aurora Consurgens; A Document Attributed to Thomas Aquinas on the Problem of Opposites in US Public Domain wikimedia.
An illustration of a hermaphrodite from the Aurora consurgens– 15th century. Thomas Aquinas; Marie-Louise von Franz (1966) Aurora Consurgens; A Document Attributed to Thomas Aquinas on the Problem of Opposites in US Public Domain wikimedia.

This image is from the Aurora Consurgens. The Aurora Consurgens is an alchemical manuscript from the 15th century. The work has been attributed to Thomas Aquinas, although the true author is yet unknown. Aurora Consurgens is a Latin name which translates to “rising dawn.”

According to Carl Jung the hermaphrodite represents the union of opposites.  Jung says that the hermaphrodite “has become a symbol of the creative union of opposites, a ‘uniting symbol’ in the literal sense.” (CW 9i, para. 292-4)

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The Hermaphrodite in Ovid

Ovidius, Metamorphoseon libri XV (traduction anonyme), Belgique, Flandre, XVe siècle ou le Mysterium Conjunctionis. Creative Commons Wikimedia

In many spiritual traditions we find images of gods and goddess in union. Jung calls these unity symbols the syzygy. They are images of wholeness appearing in art, religious arcana, dreams and imagination. In archetypal psychology they signify the union of opposites. In particular, they signify the union of the conscious and unconscious elements of the psyche, and thus are an image of the wholeness of the Self.

Carl Jung says, “A syzygy or coniunctio symbolizes the essence of wholeness (as also does the Platonic hermaphrodite, who later became the symbol of perfected wholeness in alchemical philosophy).” (CW 9i, para. 326)4

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Theophany, soul’s imagination

Theophany by Pskov- 13th- 14th century, from: http://www.wco.ru/icons/. US Public Domain via wikimedia.
Theophany by Pskov- 13th- 14th century, from: http://www.wco.ru/icons/. US Public Domain via wikimedia.

In the image above we see the Theophany. Theophany is an Ancient Greek term from theophaneia, meaning “appearance of a god” [1] . The word describes the the appearance of the deity to the living soul. In Psychology and Alchemy, Carl Jung speaks of “the relationship between God and soul.” (Para. 11) Jung says:

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