Anima Muzzled

 

Drawing of Anima Muzzled by Daniel Mace. With Permission.

This drawing, titled Anima Muzzled, by Daniel Mace expresses something archetypal about mankind’s repressive relationship with the anima. In his artwork and accompanying poem Daniel address the aggressive tendencies toward the anima. His poem is as follows:

Poem of Anima muzzled by Daniel Mace

Her hard wide eyes glare out on an unhearing masculine world…

The maternal earth mother, the nourishing female matrix, the inner mistress, the inner companion, woman to the man, connection to all things through the womb and through the coursing blood…

Multi‐laminate hard leather muzzle covers nose, nostrils, mouth and chin… the jaw is immobilized… no speech is possible… words are not… communication is not…

Love and affection have lost their moisture… the land suffers drought… fluids do not flow… bitter flakes of powdered flesh are sloughed off, retire…

Noble, proud and gifted… knowing without pride in knowing… giving without measure and without expectation of return…

Selfless self… mother of the world of relation… Hard yet soft incisive eyes… clear, reflective, big and focused eyes… cat woman… porcelain doll… flesh born fury… feminine fury… ever alive… muzzled and alive…

What is it in the human race that seek to repress, to immobilize, the anima? Why do we wish to bind, to quiet, the anima? What do we lose when we repress our nourishing inner companion?

Carl Jung knew all to well the human desire to repress the anima– to split off from our own soul. In Psychology and Religion (1960), Carl Jung says that the anima is the “representative of the female minority concealed below the threshold the consciousness.” (p.50) She is the symbolic emissary of our “unconscious nature” and of our “emotional needs.” (p.50)

Carl Jung tells us that the anima is repressed insofar as we avoid such things as “love, devotion, loyalty, confidence, emotional dependence, and general submission to the soul’s needs.” (p.50)

Beyond the personal relationship to the anima there is also the collective. Carl Jung spent much of his life trying to help us see that Western civilization has split from the Anima Mundi, the world soul. He knew that in doing so we sever our connection to the primal ground, our “primordial oneness.” (p.50) Jung says that mankind “has succeeded in isolating the mind in its own sphere and in severing it from its primordial oneness with the uni­verse…. his “anima”… the World Soul.” (Psychological Commentaries to ‘The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, 1954)

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