Anima Mundi: the soul of the world

Robert Fludd, Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris. Wellcome Library, London. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only license CC BY 4.0
Robert Fludd, Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris. Wellcome Library, London.
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only license CC BY 4.0

In the above image, we see the anima mundi as the soul of the world. Robert Fludd’s diagram represents the “correspondences between man and all parts of the created universe” [1]. Fludd understood the “powers of the human soul to glean information from the larger soul of the world.” [2] In Timaeus, Plato speaks of the anima mundi:

“This world is indeed a living being endowed with a soul and intelligence … a single visible living entity containing all other living entities, which by their nature are all related.”

Carl Jung laments our loss of connection to the anima mundi:

“The development of Western philosophy during the last two centuries has succeeded in isolating the mind in its own sphere and in severing it from its primordial oneness with the universe. Man himself has ceased to be the microcosm and eidolon of the cosmos, and his “anima” is no longer the consubstantial scintilla, spark of the Anima Mundi, World Soul” (Carl Jung, CW 11, para 759)

Reference:

  1. Princeton University
  2. Robert Fludd, in Art and Practice of Geomancy: Divination, Magic, and Earth Wisdom of the , p.24
  3. Carl Jung, Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious – CW 9i  (1934–1954) (1981 2nd ed. Collected Works Vol.9 Part 1)