Active Imagination

Freud's couch at the Freud Museum in London. Photo by Robert Huffstutter via Wikimedia.
Freud’s couch at the Freud Museum in London. Photo by Robert Huffstutter via Wikimedia.

According to Jung (1997) there are several ways that one can access the imagination:

The visual type of person allows the active imagination to arise through inner images.  Jung (1997) states that for this type of person a images will appear in the mind’s eye. They then follow that image, and allow it to change and shift. This process allows the divine to present itself in one image or a series of images, much like the dreaming process.

The second type is the audio-visual type of person.  These individuals usually hear words or perhaps fragments of various apparently meaningless sentences.  Sometimes the auditory person hears their internal voice. This ‘voice’ comes across as an audible voice that can be heard as an internal dialogue. This internal voice is sometimes known as the muse.

The third predominant way of expressing our relationship to the divine via active imaginations is through the hands, by creating  art.  A fourth way is by experimenting through the movements of the body.  A fifth way is through a process of automatic writing, although Jung claims that this method is rare.

Reference

Jung on Active Imagination – Dr. C. G. Jung, Joan Chodorow- 1997

Jung, C. G., The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious – CW 9i  (1934–1954) (1981 2nd ed. Collected Works Vol.9 Part 1)

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