The Divine Body of God

Adoration of Shiva, 1696, India, Himachal Pradesh, Nurpur, South Asia from LACMA museum. US public domain via wikimedia.
Adoration of Shiva, 1696, India, Himachal Pradesh, Nurpur, South Asia from LACMA museum. US public domain via wikimedia.

Carl Jung says that the Self is indistinguishable from the God image. Jung says:

“The spontaneous symbols of the self, or of wholeness, cannot in practice be distinguished from a God-image” (CW 9ii).

The Vedas say that God is the Self. The Brahma sūtras (C 10, V 20) say:

I am the Self, O Guḍākeśa, seated in the hearts of all creatures. I am the beginning, the middle and the end of all beings.

The Katha Upanishad (C 2, P 20) confirm the truth: God, as Self, is hidden in all creatures.

The Self is smaller than small, greater than great, hidden in the heart of all living creatures.

The 12th Century Indian philosopher Basavanna tells us that all Gods are image or forms of Shiva. Shiva is called the supreme Self:

When the ghosts read the writing on the skulls Śiva wears around his neck, they know, “This one is Brahma, this one is Visnu, this one is Indra, this is Death.”

Worlds emerge and words fall but the Self remains. Gods emerge and Gods fall but the Self remains. When all things perish, are burned up in the fires of life, the Self alone remains. Know this eternal truth of the Self and you are free. 

References:

  1. The Archetypes and The Collective Unconscious (Collected Works of C.G. Jung Vol.9 Part 1)
  2. Brahma sūtras
  3. Katha Upanishad
  4. The Alchemical Body: Siddha Traditions in Medieval India By David Gordon White

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